Optimizing Information Freshness in Wireless Networks (CS/EE Joint Networking and Systems Seminar)

Date: Thursday, February 21
Time: 12:00pm
Location: Computer Science Building 480
Speaker: Prof. Eytan Modiano, Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, MIT
Faculty host: Professor Gil Zussman

Abstract: Age of Information (AoI) is a recently proposed performance metric that captures the freshness of the information from the perspective of the application.  AoI measures the time that elapsed from the moment that the most recently received packet was generated to the present time.  In this talk, we explore the AoI optimization problem in wireless networks.

We start by considering a wireless network with a number of nodes transmitting information to a Base Station. We develop three low-complexity transmission scheduling policies that attempt to minimize AoI, and evaluate their performance against the optimal policy. In particular, we develop a randomized policy, a Max-Weight policy and a Whittle’s Index policy, and show that they are guaranteed to be within a factor of two, four and eight, respectively, away from the minimum AoI possible.

We then extend our results to wireless networks under general interference constraints.  We show that when fresh information is always available for transmission, a stationary scheduling policy is peak age optimal, and is within a factor of two of the optimal average age.  When fresh information is not always available, and packet generation rate has to be controlled along with scheduling links for transmission, we prove an important separation principle: the optimal scheduling policy can be designed assuming fresh information, and independently, the packet generation rate control can be done by ignoring interference.  Finally, we consider multi-hop wireless networks with general interference constraints, and obtain the optimal policy from the class of stationary policies in which links are activated according to a stationary probability distribution.

Bio: Eytan Modiano received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Connecticut at Storrs in 1986 and his M.S. and PhD degrees, both in Electrical Engineering, from the University of Maryland, College Park, MD, in 1989 and 1992 respectively.  He was a Naval Research Laboratory Fellow between 1987 and 1992 and a National Research Council Post Doctoral Fellow during 1992-1993.  Between 1993 and 1999 he was with MIT Lincoln Laboratory.  Since 1999 he has been on the faculty at MIT, where he is a Professor and Associate Department Head in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Associate Director of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS).

His research is on communication networks and protocols with emphasis on satellite, wireless, and optical networks.   He is the co-recipient of the Infocom 2018 Best paper award, the MobiHoc 2018 best paper award, MobiHoc 2016 best paper award, the Wiopt 2013 best paper award, and the Sigmetrics 2006 Best paper award.  He is the Editor-in-Chief for IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, and served as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking.  He was the Technical Program co-chair for  IEEE Wiopt 2006, IEEE Infocom 2007, ACM MobiHoc 2007, and DRCN 2015.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE and an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, and served on the IEEE Fellows committee.


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