Bing Dialog Model: Intent, Knowledge, and Interaction

April 11, 2012
11:00am-12:00pm
Davis Auditorium
Hosted by: Columbia CS Department
Speaker: Dr. Harry Shum , corporate vice president for search product development (Microsoft Research)

Abstract

The decade-old Internet search outcomes, manifested in the document-centric form of "ten blue links," are no longer sufficient for Internet users. Many studies have shown that when users are ushered off the conventional search result pages through blue links, their needs are often partially met at best in a "hit-or-miss" fashion. To tackle this challenge, we have designed Bing (http://www.bing.com), Microsoft's search engine, to not just navigate users to a landing page through a blue link but to continue engaging with users to clarify intent and facilitate task completion with Bing's deep understanding of the underlying entities and domains of user interest.

Powering this new paradigm is the Bing Dialog Model that consists of three building blocks: an indexing system that comprehensively collects information from the web and systematically harvests knowledge, an intent model that statistically infers user intent and predicts next action based on the harvested knowledge, and an interaction model that elicits user intent through mathematically optimized presentations of web information and knowledge that matches user needs.

In this talk, I'll describe Bing Dialog Model in details and demonstrate it in action through some innovative features, in particular applying social contexts and entity understanding for user task completion.his talk, I'll describe Bing Dialog Model in details and demonstrate it in action through some innovative features, in particular applying social contexts and entity understanding for user task completion.

Speaker Biography

Harry Shum is the corporate vice president responsible for search product development at Microsoft Corporation, http://www.bing.com. Previously, he oversaw the research activities at Microsoft Research Asia and the lab's collaborations with universities in the Asia Pacific region, and was responsible for the Internet Services Research Center, an applied research organization dedicated to long-term and short-term technology investments in search and advertising at Microsoft. Shum joined Microsoft Research in 1996 as a researcher based in Redmond, Washington. He moved to Beijing as one of the founding members of Microsoft Research China (later renamed Microsoft Research Asia). There he began a nine-year tenure as a research manager, subsequently moving on to become assistant managing director, managing director of Microsoft Research Asia, Distinguished Engineer and Corporate Vice President. Shum is an IEEE Fellow and an ACM Fellow for his contributions on computer vision and computer graphics. Shum received a doctorate in robotics from the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.


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